Volume 11:3
Contents

Not the Rock of Ages:
What should we make of the Northern Rock imbroglio?

Peter Warburton

Global warming and the new theology: a business viewpoint.
John Lovatt

Religion in the workplace.
Lord Griffiths of Fforestfach
The Paradoxical Organisation
Chris Bemrose

The Business of Peach: the role of commerce in peace building.
Peter Heslam

plus
REVIEW ARTICLES
BOOK REVIEWS
LETTERS

 
spacer

Hard copy of past issues of Faith in Business are available at £5 each from the Secretary.

If you have paid for a year's subscription to FiBQ, this is notified to the Secretary, who will post each issue to you as it is published.

VOLUME 11:3

The significant story this last year within the powerhouse of financial culture, companies and people that make up the City, has been the ongoing difficulties of Northern Rock. Peter Warburton carefully looks behind the headline news which present Northern Rock as hapless victim following the vagaries of global capital markets. Instead he sees the resulting imbroglio as a failure of moral management, leading to ongoing poor decision-making and an unbridled growth strategy. A sobering account, and a story which will undoubtedly run and run.
One of our editors, John Lovatt, provides a thoughtful piece on our approach to global warming. He posits a New Theology of creation, before reminding us that this is a rediscovered theology. John combines theological and biblical insights together with a hard-headed understanding of business.
We are pleased to publish here Lord Griffiths of Fforestfach’s Hugh Kay lecture on Religion in the Workplace. Lord Griffiths notes the rise in employees’ demands for their religious beliefs and observances to be now incorporated as part and parcel of corporate life. Lord Griffiths outlines three timely approaches to enable companies to respond appropriately.
Chris Bemrose’s readable article deals with some paradoxical characteristics of organisations. For example organisations are focused and “crunchy” when they are young, yet as they grow and become rich they become “soggy”. He chooses five paradoxical sayings of Jesus for each of his starting points.
We include two book reviews. Eve Poole, a regular contributor, reviews a collection of essays on the relationship between theology and political economy, which she warmly recommends. Sally Orwin weighs in with a review of Paul Zahl’s discussion of Grace in Practice.
Lastly, our regular, Peter Heslam in his usual concise style argues for the role of business as one pillar for the creation of a peaceful, stable civic society.
One final plug…You are all very welcome to come to this year’s Faith in Business Conference, held at Ridley Hall from April 11 to 13. Details may be found on the website and elsewhere in this edition of Faith in Business Quarterly. Enjoy!

Purchase this volume

   
mail@fibq.org
    FIBQ Lower Stonehouse Farm, Brown Edge, Stoke-on-Trent, ST6 8TF